Bitcoin & Cryptocurrency on the FBAR: Definitive Guide

US Tax Guide for ETH and other cryptocurrencies

Introduction:  
Greetings, fellow ethtraders! Happy New Year! In the next few months, taxpayers across the US will be filing their 2017 tax returns. As an Enrolled Agent and a ETH/cryptocurrency investor and enthusiast, I wanted to write up a brief guide on how your investments in ETH and other cryptocurrencies are taxed in the US.
 
 
1. Are ETH/cryptocurrency realized gains taxable?
Yes. The IRS treats virtual currency (such as cryptocurrency) as property. That means if you sell ETH, BTC, or any other cryptocurrency that has appreciated in value, you have realized a capital gain and must pay taxes on this income. If you held the position for one year or less, it is a short-term capital gain which is taxed at your ordinary income tax rate. If you held the position for more than one year, it is a long-term capital gain which is taxed at your long-term capital gains tax rate. In most cases, this is 15%, but could also be 0% or 20% depending on your specific ordinary income tax bracket.
 
2. If I sell my ETH for USD on Coinbase but do not transfer the USD from Coinbase to my bank account, am I still taxed?
Yes. The only thing that matters is that you sold the ETH, which creates a taxable transaction. Whether you transfer the USD to your bank account or not does not matter.
 
3. If I use my ETH to buy OMG or another cryptocurrency, is this a taxable transaction?
Most likely yes. See #4 below for a more detailed explanation. If assuming crypto to crypto trades are not able to be like-kind exchanged, then continue on to the next paragraph here.
This is actually two different transactions. The first transaction is selling your ETH for USD. The second transaction is buying the OMG with your USD. You must manually calculate these amounts. For example, I buy 1 ETH for $600 on Coinbase. Later on, the price of 1 ETH rises to $700. I transfer that 1 ETH to Bittrex and use it to buy 37 OMG. I have to report a capital gain of $100 because of this transaction. My total cost basis for the 37 OMG I purchased is $700.
 
4. If I use my ETH to buy OMG or other cryptocurrency, could that be considered a tax-free like-kind exchange?
Probably not. The new tax law says that like-kind exchanges only pertain to real estate transactions. This was done with Section 13303, which replaced “property” with “real property” for all of Section 1031 (page 72 near the bottom). My personal interpretation:
In 2018 and going forward, cryptocurrencies can definitely not be like-kind exchanged.
In 2017 and before, it is a very gray area. I personally am not taking the position that they can be like-kind exchanged, because if the IRS went after a taxpayer who did this, the IRS would probably win and the taxpayer would owe taxes, interest, and probably penalties on every single little gain made from trading one cryptocurrency for another.
Here is a great interpretation of why trading cryptocurrency for cryptocurrency is probably not a like-kind transaction.
In my opinion, the biggest factor is that like-kind exchanges must be reported on Form 8824 and not just ignored. Therefore, if a taxpayer is claiming like-kind exchanges on crypto to crypto exchanges, he or she would have to fill out a Form 8824 for each individual transaction of crypto to crypto, which would be absolutely cumbersome if there are hundreds or thousands of such trades.
Here is another article about like-kind exchanges.
Here is the American Institute of CPAs' letter to the IRS, dated June 10, 2016, asking them to release guidance on whether crypto to crypto can be like-kind exchanged or not. The IRS has not responded to the letter.
 
5. How do I calculate the realized capital gain or loss on the sale of my cryptocurrency?
The realized gain or loss is your total proceeds from the sale minus what you purchased those positions for (your cost basis). For example, you bought 1 ETH for $300 in June of 2017. In December of 2017, you sold that 1 ETH for $800. Your realized gain would be $800 - $300 = $500. Since you held it for one year or less, the $500 would be a short-term capital gain taxed at your ordinary income tax rate.
 
6. Which ETH's cost basis do I use if I have multiple purchases?
The cost basis reporting method is up to you. For example, I buy my first ETH at $300, a second ETH at $530, and a third ETH at $400. Later on, I sell one ETH for $800. I can use:
FIFO (first in first out) - cost basis would the first ETH, $300, which would result in a gain of $500.
LIFO (last in first out) - cost basis would be the third ETH, $400, which would result in a gain of $400.
Average cost - cost basis would be the average of the three ETH, $410, which would result in a gain of $390.
Specific identification - I can just choose which coin's cost basis to use. For example, I can choose the second ETH's cost basis, $530, which would result in the lowest capital gains possible of $270.
 
7. If I end up with a net capital loss, can I claim this on my tax return?
Capital gains and capital losses are netted on your tax return. If the net result of this is a capital loss, you may offset it against ordinary income on your tax return, but only at a maximum of $3,000 per year. The remaining losses are carried forward until you use them up.
 
8. What is the tax rate on my capital gains?
If long-term, the tax rate is 0%, 15%, or 20%, depending on your ordinary income tax bracket. If short-term, the tax bracket you’ll be in will depend on your total income and deductions. The ordinary income tax brackets are 10%, 15%, 25%, 28%, 33%, 35%, and 39.6% in 2017 and 10%, 12%, 22%, 24%, 32%, 35%, and 37% in 2018 and going forward.
Here are the 2017 and 2018 ordinary income tax brackets.
Here are the 2017 and 2018 long-term capital gains tax brackets.
Here is a detailed article on how the calculation of long-term capital gains tax work and how you can take advantage of the 0% long-term capital gains rate, if applicable.
 
9. If I mine ETH or any other cryptocurrency, is this taxable?
Yes. IRS Notice 2014-21 states that mining cryptocurrency is taxable. For example, if you mined $7,000 worth of ETH in 2017, you must report $7,000 of income on your 2017 tax return. For many taxpayers, this will be reported on your Schedule C, and you will most likely owe self-employment taxes on this income as well. The $7,000 becomes the cost basis in your ETH position.
 
10. How do I calculate income for the cryptocurrency I mined?
This is the approach I would take. Say I mined 1 ETH on December 31, 2017. I would look up the daily historical prices for ETH and average the high and low prices for ETH on December 31, 2017, which is ($760.35 + $710.12) / 2 = $735.24. I would report $735.24 of income on my tax return. This would also be the cost basis of the 1 ETH I mined.
 
11. Can I deduct mining expenses on my tax return?
If you are reporting the income from mining on Schedule C, then you can deduct expenses on Schedule C as well. You can deduct the portion of your electricity costs allocated to mining, and then you depreciate the cost of your mining rig over time (probably over five years). Section 179 also allows for the full deduction of the cost of certain equipment in year 1, so you could choose to do that if you wanted to instead.
 
12. If I receive ETH or other cryptocurrency as a payment for my business, is this taxable?
Yes. Similar to mining, your income would be what the value of the coins you received was. This would also be your cost basis in the coins.
 
13. If I received Bitcoin Cash as a result of the hard fork on August 1, 2017, is this taxable?
Most likely yes. For example, if you owned 1 Bitcoin and received 1 Bitcoin Cash on August 1, 2017 as a result of the hard fork, your income would be the value of 1 Bitcoin Cash on that date. Bitcoin.tax uses a value of $277. This value would also be your cost basis in the position. Any other hard forks would probably be treated similarly. Airdrops may be treated similarly as well, in the IRS' view.
Here are a couple more good articles about reporting the Bitcoin Cash fork as taxable ordinary income. The second one goes into depth and cites a US Supreme Court decision as precedent: one, two
 
14. If I use ETH, BTC, or other cryptocurrency to purchase goods or services, is this a taxable transaction?
Yes. It would be treated as selling your cryptocurrency for USD, and then using that USD to purchase those goods or services. This is because the IRS treats cryptocurrency as property and not currency.
 
15. Are cryptocurrencies subject to the wash sale rule?
Probably not. Section 1091 only applies to stock or securities. Cryptocurrencies are not classified as stocks or securities. Therefore, you could sell your ETH at a loss, repurchase it immediately, and still realize this loss on your tax return, whereas you cannot do the same with a stock. Please see this link for more information.
 
16. What if I hold cryptocurrency on an exchange based outside of the US?
There are two separate foreign account reporting requirements: FBAR and FATCA.
A FBAR must be filed if you held more than $10,000 on an exchange based outside of the US at any point during the tax year.
A Form 8938 (FATCA) must be filed if you held more than $75,000 on an exchange based outside of the US at any point during the tax year, or more than $50,000 on the last day of the tax year.
The penalties are severe for not filing these two forms if you are required to. Please see the second half of this post for more information on foreign account reporting.
 
17. What are the tax implications of gifting cryptocurrency?
Small gifts of cryptocurrency do not have a tax implication for the gift giver or for the recipient. The recipient would retain the gift giver's old cost basis, so it could be a good idea for the gift giver to provide records of the original cost basis to the recipient as well (or else the recipient would have to assume a cost basis of $0 if the recipient ever sells the cryptocurrency).
Large gifts of cryptocurrency could start having gift and estate tax implications on the giver if the value exceeds more than $14,000 (in 2017) or $15,000 (in 2018) per year per recipient.
Here's a good article on Investopedia on this issue.
An important exception applies if the gift giver gives cryptocurrency that has a cost basis that is higher than the market value at the time of the gift. Please see the middle of this post for more information on that.
 
18. Where can I learn even more about cryptocurrency taxation?
Unchained Podcast: The Tax Rules That Have Crypto Users Aghast
IRS Notice 2014-21
Great reddit post from tax attorney Tyson Cross from 2014
 
19. Are there any websites that you recommend in helping me with all of this?
Yes - I have used bitcoin.tax and highly recommend it. You can import directly from an exchange to the website using API, and/or export a .csv/excel file from the exchange and import it into the website. The exchanges I successfully imported from were Coinbase, GDAX, Bittrex, and Binance. The result is a .csv or other file that you can import into your tax software.
I have also heard good things about cointracking.info but have not personally used it myself.
 
20. Taxation is theft!
I can't help you there.
 
 
That is the summary I have for now. There have been a lot of excellent cryptocurrency tax guides on reddit, such as this one, this one, and this one, but I wanted to post my short summary guide on ethtrader which hopefully answers some of the questions you all may have about US taxation of ETH and other cryptocurrencies. Please let me know if you have any more questions, and I’d be happy to answer them to the best of my ability. Thank you!
Regarding edits: I have made many edits to my post since I originally posted it. Please refresh to see the latest edits to my guide. Thank you.
 
Disclaimer:
The information contained within this post is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended to substitute for obtaining tax, accounting, or financial advice from a professional.
Any U.S. federal tax advice contained in this post is not intended to be used for the purpose of avoiding penalties under U.S. federal tax law.
Presentation of the information via the Internet is not intended to create, and receipt does not constitute, an advisor-client relationship. Internet users are advised not to act upon this information without seeking the service of a tax professional.
submitted by Nubboi to ethtrader [link] [comments]

BitcoinTaxes Podcast: Crypto Audits w/ Alex Kugelman

BitcoinTaxes Podcast Link
TLDR; Alex Kugelman, a tax controversy lawer, discusses crypto audits and how to avoid them.
Highlights:
IRS audits are a real possibility for anyone who has traded cryptocurrencies. Our guest today is Alex Kugelman, a tax controversy lawyer with an abundance of knowledge concerning cryptocurrency audits. He's here to share his expertise on IRS cryptocurrency audits, including risk reduction strategies as well as enforcement predictions and misconceptions.
Alex Kugelman specializes in IRS audits. His experience includes four years of Federal government court experience at the U.S. Tax Court and a U.S. District Court. [00:40]
Alex: I'm an attorney out in California. I clerked for a US District Court judge and as well as the United States Tax Court. I've been in private practice exclusively doing tax controversy work for the past five years or so. I kind of got involved with crypto towards the end of 2016. I tended to represent clients mainly with compliance & disclosure issues with respect to cryptocurrency. I just really like it. Really interesting area.
The Coinbase summons in 2018 played a major role in Alex's interest in crypto audits. [01:19]
Alex: What started me into the crypto space was when the IRS first issued summons for Coinbase. We started getting some interesting calls regarding that. And at that time I thought to myself, this might be an interesting area. So I started following the actual summons enforcement proceeding at the District Court here in San Francisco - from there kind of worked with people under different types of compliance, including international disclosures. Now we're starting to see some of the first cryptocurrency audits come through.
First, let's get a brief rundown of how IRS audits work. [02:00]
Alex: It is important to understand the IRS as an administrative agency and all different layers of it. So when it comes to an audit the term that the IRS uses is an examination and there's three basic levels.
The first is a correspondence exam. That's where you get a letter that says, dear taxpayer, so-and-so reported that you had $100 of interest income that wasn't on your tax return - we're going to increase your tax. If you want to challenge that, you can. And that's basically termed an under reporter notice. That's probably not going to be a cryptocurrency audit if you get that notice.
The next one is an office exam. That is someone in the local IRS office sending you a letter that says, we have selected a certain tax return for audit and we're going to look at these issues. We'd like you to call us to schedule an appointment. That's going to be usually a tax compliance officer that is doing that.
The third and probably the most serious level of exam is a field examination. That's also going to be a local IRS representative, typically a revenue agent. There, the revenue agent may come to your work or ask come to your work or business to kind of conduct the audit.
All three of those are going to start the same: a letter that's sent to you at your most recent address provided to the IRS.
Cryptocurrency audits follow a similar protocol. [05:40]
Alex: I think it's likely that most crypto audits are going to start with one of two things happening. One is that there is information from the Coinbase summons that is inconsistent with what was on a taxpayer's tax return. I think for someone who's involved with that issue, they're going to have a good sense of that one because they should've gotten an email notice from Coinbase.
Or two, the audit notice is going to identify older tax years - 2013, 2014 or 2015 because those are the years that the information related to.
Another reason I think people will get audited is going to be because information on the return is incomplete, in the sense that the taxpayer or the cryptocurrency owner reports some transactions, without enough detail to figure out the actual cost basis.
Does reporting your data in an aggregated fashion increase your chances of being audited? [06:45]
Alex: I mean one - to the extent that there's going to be a lot of taxpayers - a lot of people use TurboTax, right? If that's the way TurboTax is preparing all of those returns, it would seem to me you're kind of in a herd of people like that. And at least it's consistent with what a lot of people are doing. The second part of that is going to be at least those people who have prepare the returns in that manner, they're going to, or should have, the underlying data. So even if it's an aggregate reporting of each asset class as opposed to each individual trade, if there ever were questions then you're going to have your CSV files, you're going to have your Bitcoin.tax exports, you're going to have all the information that you need to back that up.
Alex is an advocate of over-reporting your information to the IRS. [09:30]
Alex: I'm a big proponent of over-reporting - and I don't mean paying too much tax. I just mean including too much information. Because at some point there's kind of two ways that your returned can be flagged: a computer flags the return for some reason or there's a special unit or a person who actually flags it. At the end of the day, a human being will be looking at that return and deciding whether it actually is going to go all the way through to an audit. I want them to completely understand what's being reported, why it's been reported, and if there's too much information, that's fine - it's less likely that someone's going to have more questions.
A crypto audit is very likely to be a field exam - and it's important to hire a good rep. [11:00]
Alex: It's very likely going to be a field exam, which means you're going to have a revenue agent - and those are kind of the best of the best auditors for an IRS audit. And remember - an IRS audit is a civil matter. It is not criminal at this point. Again, it's unlikely that it will become criminal. It is, however, the highest level of audit you're going to get.
If you're going to hire a representative, which you have every right to do, you should contact that person, let them know what's going on and probably have them interface with the auditor. You should receive, as part of the opening notice or letter, the information document request - which is identifying what things to bring for the auditor. Also, it'll tip to what topics might be important. For example the typical things you're going to see will be bank statements, financial or asset account statements, which I view as requesting exchange statements or exchange CSV files. Any documents that show the cost basis for your cryptocurrency trades.
Audits are more art than science. [13:35]
Alex: The auditor has a fair amount of power. So if you play real hardball - that's not going to prevent the auditor from expanding to other years. So when you get that audit notice ,and let's say that you're going to deal with this yourself, the first thing you want to kind of figure out is what are the areas that I wouldn't want to go into, and what are the areas that I don't have good records? That will help guide the way to respond or what information to pull together.
The reality is, and let's just be honest here - for most people reporting cryptocurrency gains, they have all of the information. The IRS does not have much. They might have some records from Coinbase, but it's not as if they have a treasure trove of third party data.
The burden is really going to be, in every audit, on the taxpayer to prove their tax return is correct.
It's difficult to say how lenient the IRS will be regarding past years. [15:35]
Alex: I think the way that I would look at it is that maybe the standard of of records required to really substantiate older years might be a little bit lower for older years as opposed to now because it's different now. There's a lot better information provided by some of the exchanges. There's a lot more software out there to help you, especially for people who are newer to crypto. You should have access to all your bank records. You should still have a lot of emails, reflecting on-ramping off-ramping, or other purchases. You should be able to kind of pull this all together.
I can understand when we have clients who come in and are early adopters and they're missing chunks of information. So I do think that in those types of circumstances, yes, I think there would be a little bit of leniency. But I don't think if you're asking, hey, I reported my gains in 2017 but I never really did it 14, 15 or 16 - I don't think that's going to be viewed very favorably.
It is possible to substantiate your data without all of your records. [19:00]
Alex: I think the first thing is, I mean, outside of cryptocurrency and just generally in audits, how many people have complete records to support everything on their tax return from three years ago? Right? It's just not the reality.
The best source of information in a lot of these cryptocurrency clients are the clients themselves. They kind of know what they did and they can remember. There's some who take good notes and other people don't, but as you go through and ask people: what exchanges have you've been on, what type of coins, if you bought any ICOs, have you ever sold for actual US cash, and have you ever bought goods or services? As you talk through things people tend to recall what happened. We use that information and we cross check that against bank statements, as well as CSV files, to pick out what those transactions look like.
Most people have some sort of records, at least reflecting the transfer in and the transfer back out of that exchange. So you can use historical data and historical pricing information to essentially estimate what that transaction would have been. And then what we do is we provide a written statement summary of what we're doing and why we're doing it.
The other big one that we see all the time - and anybody listening to this, please hear this, do not trade for your friends on your exchange accounts - because that type of commingling causes such major problems. Essentially you are walking into those taxable gains just because you're allowing someone access to the exchange to make sales.
If you need representation for an audit, get representation. [23:00]
Alex: My general rule is that I think experienced representatives are really important. I probably would not hire the CPA that prepared my return unless they were: one, experienced with being a representative in audits. And two, you felt comfortable that they weren't going to go in there with a conflict of interest. But I do think if you're worried about going into audit - hiring a skilled, and experienced rep is really, really important.
If they're experienced with this, they should understand the appropriate ethical standards and go in there and essentially help resolve portions of the audit and move it to a resolution that you can deal with.
Taxpayers actually have a lot of leverage in an audit. And that sounds crazy to say, but there is a lot of truth to that. And so as you're kind of working through the audit itself, you want to make sure that you're not just agreeing to something to be done with it. You're not agreeing to something just because you think that you'll get in more trouble or get a worse result otherwise.
There are important risk-reduction strategies you can utilize to avoid a crypto audit. [28:15]
Alex: The first thing that you really want to do, is just assess; for those of you that are really worried about an audit - just assess what it is you've actually done over the years. When did you start trading, what exchanges were you on, do you have records that reflect on-ramping and off-ramping? And that's going to be your bank account statements. Do you know where you've been, what exchanges you've been on?
For foreign exchanges, there may not be as much of that AML & KYC compliance, but I really believe that you do have reporting requirements under FATCA for FBAR and something called an 8938, which if you listen to the podcast with Tyson, he kind of explains what that is. But it's basically if you have ownership of a foreign bank account or asset, you have certain reporting requirements, whether you've had income or not.
You want to make sure you at least track when you've actually exchanged crypto for cash or vice versa. That's partly because that's one of those areas where when people can get in trouble with some sort of federal investigators - because those types of transactions can be potentially considered money laundering.
For those who believe that they've used like-kind exchange rules to defer taxable gains -you should look on your tax returns to see if you filed the form 8824, which is where like kind exchanges are actually reported. That kind of goes back to the over reporting issue I was talking about before. I think that if you didn't report the actual trades that you're taking like-kind treatment for in past years, I don't know that you've actually taken like-kind treatment to be frank with you. I think, objectively, that might be viewed as just not reporting certain transactions.
You want to make sure that you address these issues sooner rather than later.
1099-K forms can be misleading - to the recipient and, potentially, the auditor. [32:40]
Alex: A 1099-K is actually a merchant processing third party information returns. And it really is typically associated with people who have credit card sales - so it's going to reflect a gross amount and typically on a monthly basis.
It shows the gross amount and what I've seen too is that sometimes transfers actually get caught into that amount as well. So it's not even just gross sales or purchases - it may have other information. So the 1099-K can be really inflated. That's why reconciling that against accounting records is really, really important because that is one of those issues that I think could lead to an exam.
To those who think crypto isn't beholden to tax laws: you are not correct. [37:38]
Alex: The current commissioner of the IRS is Charles Rettig, and he's a really well known practitioner in tax controversy. I know from people that know him well, that he's actually mentioned Reddit as one of the reasons that cryptocurrency enforcement is his number one enforcement priority right now.
The other person that I've seen speak a couple of times is the head of the IRS Criminal Investigation Unit. His name is Don Fort and every year he does a presentation at the National Tax Controversy and Criminal Tax Conference. The last two years cryptocurrency has been number two and number one on his list. As much as the IRS lacks the funding and the manpower that it needs for all the enforcement, the IRS CI are really, really good and they are probably best agency at dealing with cryptocurrency enforcement issues.
I really think that it's gaining steam and I think once the audits from the Coinbase summons kind of get going, I think it's going to be a really scrutinized area. I think the people who have gone through the cost and the pain of disclosing and amending returns and doing everything they can will be happy that they did in a couple of years. I think the other people are going to be sweating it out - I don't know if it's ever really worth it to be honest with you. I would recommend people do their best to get in compliance.
In summary: do your best to report your crypto gains and losses - and don't try to pull one over on the IRS. [42:36]
Alex: For people who have potential issues with past years, one is getting a consistent record and just amending your past years, so they're consistent.
For people who have the foreign account issues - let's just say, for example, had an account with Binance, and that Binance account was never reported. The IRS has disclosure programs that allow you to amend certain returns, pay the tax that you report and pay a penalty, which would be 5% of the the highest account value that you have.
For people who don't want to deal with this, I think taking evasive steps is the best way to get the worst result possible. One of the things that I learned very early in dealing with audits and tax compliance, is that you can always make things worse. I think you really just want to address it and resolve the issue while you have a good opportunity.
We may see criminal prosecution of some of the "big fish" tax evaders from the Coinbase summons. [46:43]
Alex: Yeah, and I think the two things that I'm fairly certain we're going to see: one is we're going to see the IRS use the information provided by Coinbase to start auditing the biggest account holders from that period. I think that's very likely.
Probably the second one that I would say is very likely is that you're going to see limited criminal prosecutions related to cryptocurrency. And these are going to be people that have some sort of level of notoriety, whether actually famous or maybe famous in the cryptocurrency world. That's typically how the IRS and Department of Justice uses limited resources to prosecute criminal tax tax crimes.
Alex is a great guy to reach out to with any audit-related questions, crypto or otherwise. [48:50]
Alex: You can go to my website: www.kugelmanlaw.com. You can email me at [email protected]. I have clients all over the country, international clients. If you need any sort of help, whether that's representing you, or at least doing the nitty gritty audit investigation, we're always willing to talk to people and help them out as best we can.

If you enjoyed our podcast, be sure to check back frequently for more great discussions about a range of topics in the crypto space. If you have any questions for Alex Kugelman, or want to schedule a consultation with him, he can be reached via his website www.kugelmanlaw.com, or via email at [email protected].
If you would like to request a topic for an interview, or have any questions related to this podcast, be sure to reach out to us at [email protected].
submitted by Sal-BitcoinTax to bitcointaxes [link] [comments]

Hi /r/ethtrader! I quit my job to start Cointaxes to answer questions about taxes and digital currencies so you can have confidence even if you're not a HODLer! Sharing our first comprehensive article on the Coinbase & Gemini 1099-K. Would love your input on ANY other topics or questions! :)

Hi /ethtrader! Thank you for reading this.
I felt the world of digital currencies is a bit too uncertain, so I want to do what I can to create more confidence and certainty! Please let me know if you have any questions or comments (I'll probably respond to every comment here!)
Check out our first comprehensive article on the Coinbase / Gemini 1099-K
Some "fun" facts you may not know about digital currency taxes
Here's two quick "fun" facts you may not know. We will be posting in-depth articles on these, too. Consider subscribing to our newsletter to hear first when they've been published!
About Cointaxes
Cointaxes was formed and funded with the mission to establish confidence and certainty around cryptocurrency.
We see global adoption of digital currencies as an inevitability. The uncertainty lies in how effectively and smoothly this once-in-a-lifetime shift occurs. As a tax preparation service, we have a special seat in the cryptocurrency ecosystem directly related to this uncertainty: it is our job to help both citizens and governments around the world understand how to use and treat digital currencies.
If our mission excites you
Disclaimers
Important Disclaimers: This is NOT tax advice and should NOT be relied upon for making any tax decisions. We always recommend speaking to a tax professional before making decisions related to your taxes and our guides are not a substitute for tax advice. While I have assembled and provided this information to the best of its knowledge, I make no representations or warranties as to the accuracy or timeliness of the information contained herein. You can read the full disclaimers here.
submitted by StopTheVok to ethtrader [link] [comments]

Hi /r/Bitcoin! I quit my job to start Cointaxes to answer questions about taxes and digital currencies so you can have confidence even if you're not a HODLer! Sharing our first comprehensive article on the Coinbase & Gemini 1099-K. Would love your input on ANY other topics or questions! :)

Hi /Bitcoin! Thank you for reading this.
I felt the world of digital currencies is a bit too uncertain, so I want to do what I can to create more confidence and certainty! Please let me know if you have any questions or comments (I'll probably respond to every comment here!)
Check out our first comprehensive article on the Coinbase / Gemini 1099-K
Some "fun" facts you may not know about digital currency taxes
Here's two quick "fun" facts you may not know. We will be posting in-depth articles on these, too. Consider subscribing to our newsletter to hear first when they've been published!
About Cointaxes
Cointaxes was formed and funded with the mission to establish confidence and certainty around cryptocurrency.
We see global adoption of digital currencies as an inevitability. The uncertainty lies in how effectively and smoothly this once-in-a-lifetime shift occurs. As a tax preparation service, we have a special seat in the cryptocurrency ecosystem directly related to this uncertainty: it is our job to help both citizens and governments around the world understand how to use and treat digital currencies.
If our mission excites you
Disclaimers
Important Disclaimers: This is NOT tax advice and should NOT be relied upon for making any tax decisions. We always recommend speaking to a tax professional before making decisions related to your taxes and our guides are not a substitute for tax advice. While I have assembled and provided this information to the best of its knowledge, I make no representations or warranties as to the accuracy or timeliness of the information contained herein. You can read the full disclaimers here.
submitted by StopTheVok to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Update: Hi /r/Bitcoin! I quit my job to start Cointaxes. Here to answer questions about taxes and digital currencies! I published a YouTube series on top questions, launched crypto tax tools and would love your input on ANY other topics or questions! :)

Hi /Bitcoin! Thank you for reading!
In the last two months since I posted here, my team and I have been hard at work trying to make everyone's lives a bit easier for cryptocurrency and tax. In fact, we will be able to launch some tools this summer that will help optimize your trades from a tax perspective - as you make them. We think there's a chance we could even make it tax advantageous to use crypto vs. fiat... more on that later. For now, we would love to get your feedback on what we're working on.
The TLDR: We made Cointaxes so you can estimate your tax liability and whether or not you have FINCEN obligations for free on our site. It was important to make this summary information free because our mission is create confidence and certainty around cryptocurrencies.
Please let me know if you have any questions or comments (I'll probably respond to every comment here!)
Watch a Cointaxes' YouTube Series answering the top questions How are cryptocurrencies taxed? Why should you pay this year? Am I taxed when I convert into fiat or pull money out of my exchanges? What about mining and airdrops? All this and more is covered!
We launched a tool to help measure your FINCEN requirements for FBAR & FATCA
In my last post, I mentioned a "fun" fact around FINCEN requirements. The media is talking about this more (i.e. CNBC - "How cryptocurrency investors could find themselves behind bars"). The good news is it's really simple for the ledger technology we built to check if you cross the $10,000 or $50,000 thresholds. On our site, Cointaxes, you can add your exchanges and then check if you have crossed the threshold. Importantly, we wanted to make this critical information available for free. Particularly because the the deadline is April 15.
If you fail to file the FBAR, the deadline will be extended to October 15. You can read more about this on official government sites General FBAR information, FBAR FAQS (not super helpful IMO) and the online form itself.
About Cointaxes
Cointaxes was formed and funded with the mission to establish confidence and certainty around cryptocurrency. We have a base tax preparation tool with support for Coinbase, GDAX, Binance, Bittrex, Poloniex, and Kraken.
We made Cointaxes so you can estimate your tax liability and whether or not you have FINCEN obligations for free on our site. Your detailed reports or Form 8949 for tax filing is behind a modest paywall compared to what we've seen other tools out there charging.
We see global adoption of digital currencies as an inevitability. The uncertainty lies in how effectively and smoothly this once-in-a-lifetime shift occurs. As a tax preparation service, we have a special seat in the cryptocurrency ecosystem directly related to this uncertainty: it is our job to help both citizens and governments around the world understand how to use and treat digital currencies.
If our mission excites you
Newsletter update
If you want to stay on top of regulatory and tax related crypto news (as well as when we roll out shiny new tools) then consider subscribing to our newsletter.
If you signed up for our newsletter two months ago - sorry for the lack of content! We've been too focused on trying to get this product up and running in time for the deadline (barely made it!) We recently expanded our team and will be able to be much more consistent about the content we're creating!
Important Disclaimers: For this post and any of my replies to your questions below... this is not tax advice and should not be relied upon for making any tax decisions. We always recommend speaking to a tax professional before making decisions related to your taxes and our guides are not a substitute for tax advice.
submitted by StopTheVok to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Hi /r/CryptoCurrency! I quit my job to start Cointaxes to answer questions about taxes and digital currencies so you can have confidence even if you're not a HODLer! Sharing our first comprehensive article on the Coinbase & Gemini 1099-K. Would love your input on ANY other topics or questions! :)

Hi /CryptoCurrency! Thank you for reading this.
I felt the world of digital currencies is a bit too uncertain, so I want to do what I can to create more confidence and certainty! Please let me know if you have any questions or comments (I'll probably respond to every comment here!)
Check out our first comprehensive article on the Coinbase / Gemini 1099-K
Some "fun" facts you may not know about digital currency taxes
Here's two quick "fun" facts you may not know. We will be posting in-depth articles on these, too. Consider subscribing to our newsletter to hear first when they've been published!
About Cointaxes
Cointaxes was formed and funded with the mission to establish confidence and certainty around cryptocurrency.
We see global adoption of digital currencies as an inevitability. The uncertainty lies in how effectively and smoothly this once-in-a-lifetime shift occurs. As a tax preparation service, we have a special seat in the cryptocurrency ecosystem directly related to this uncertainty: it is our job to help both citizens and governments around the world understand how to use and treat digital currencies.
If our mission excites you
Disclaimers
Important Disclaimers: This is NOT tax advice and should NOT be relied upon for making any tax decisions. We always recommend speaking to a tax professional before making decisions related to your taxes and our guides are not a substitute for tax advice. While I have assembled and provided this information to the best of its knowledge, I make no representations or warranties as to the accuracy or timeliness of the information contained herein. You can read the full disclaimers here.
submitted by StopTheVok to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

FBAR & FATCA Filing Information for Crypto Traders (Podcast & Summary)

Hey all - we've noticed a ton of our customers asking about FBAR & FATCA filing requirements. So, I interviewed a tax professional well-versed in FBAR & FATCA reporting requirements for crypto traders. Below is a link to the actual podcast, and then a summary of the interview, with timestamps in case you want to just fast forward to a certain part. Full disclosure, I work for Bitcointaxes.
BitcoinTaxes Podcast Link
Guest: Andrew Gordon, ESQ.
Topic: FBAR & FATCA Filing for Crypto
Summary:
Our guest, Andrew Gordon, is a tax attorney who understands the ins and outs of foreign account reporting in relation to cryptocurrency trading. Andrew joins us to discuss FBAR & FATCA reporting, the penalties associated with not reporting, and to address whether he believes crypto traders should be filing these forms.
Andrew has been working in the crypto-space since 2014. [00:24]
Andrew: Actually several years ago, ago in 2014, we had a client approach us who was getting paid "magic internet money", from the Ethereum Foundation. Back then the IRS had not released any guidance - it wasn't till later in 2014 that the IRS even defined Crypto as property. That was our first introduction and we were and presented the question of, well, if I'm getting paid these random tokens called Ethereum, how do we account for this?
In terms of foreign account reporting, there's two main forms you need to know about: FBAR & FATCA. The FBAR is a separate form that is due the same day as your returns. [02:42]
Andrew: FBAR is my favorite four letter word. It stands for "Foreign Bank Account Report". It isn't actually filed with your tax return. It's a separate form. It's filed online, electronically. It has the same due dates as your tax returns - April 15th and it can be extended six months to October 15th. So same due dates, but it's filed differently, still sent to the Department of Treasury - it's a separate form.
On the FBAR form, what taxpayers have to do is they have to identify the maximum value at any time during the tax year of their foreign bank accounts. If that value at anytime exceeded $10,000, you have to report. The FBAR is an informational form, which means that there's no tax actually owed.
There are popular exchanges that ARE considered foreign entities and some that are NOT considered foreign entities.[04:15]
Andrew: Unfortunately, it's not that easy because a lot of exchanges don't even make their address public - it's pretty hard to find. Even just as a starting point, I would list out all of the exchanges that you've used and try to use Google to find their addresses.
There's a couple that we know are considered foreign financial institutions at this point, and the most popular is Binance. In addition, many people suspect that Bitfinex has kind of self-reported themselves as a foreign financial institution and their information is being shared with taxing authorities.
Coinbase, Gemini, GDAX, and a number of others are considered a US-based institution.
The FATCA form is 8938, and is part of your tax-return. [06:15]
Andrew: It's very similar to the FBAR, but it's not exactly the same. One of the first differences is that the threshold for FATCA is higher. For the FBAR, your aggregate maximum holdings have to exceed $10,000. Aggregate meaning that when you add your bank accounts or crypto exchanges together, the maximum during the year exceeds $10,000.
The FATCA threshold, for a single person, is $50,000. FATCA, just like the FBAR, is an informational form, which means again, there's no tax due. The government just wants to know the maximum value of each account. One of the other differences is that FATCA is more general, so FBAR only requires foreign bank accounts to be recorded, whereas FATCA is both bank accounts and foreign assets.
There's no tax involved with these forms - but there are significant penalties for not filing when required to do so. [07:57]
Andrew: The penalties for not filing an FBAR can be very severe. One of the most basic penalties for not filing an FBAR is $10,000 per year - for non-willful offenders.
If you were willful and you just disregarded your requirement to file? Well then the penalties can be even higher - up to 75% of the maximum value of your account or your exchange values. It can be very severe. So while there's no tax, the penalties are much greater. It's one of those things to do to comply with the rules.
The FATCA form also has similar penalties.
The burden of proof for "non-willfulness" is on you. [10:14]
Andrew: To be able to prove that you are not-willful is very difficult. In general, if you file and sign your tax returns, you are signing under penalties of perjury that everything is correct. You have an obligation to know the requirements and just saying "I didn't know the law" is not sufficient proof of non-willfulness.
If you've exceeded these limits in previous years, but didn't file these forms, there are still feasible options to consider…but these options may not last forever. [16:25]
Andrew: I would suggest that if you met these requirements in earlier years, take corrective action to amend or file the returns properly. There are some IRS programs that are available to come forward and file these forms for earlier years with a reduced penalty - or in some cases, no penalty at all.
The IRS Streamlined Offshore Disclosure Program. Under this program, you have to be non-willful and you will actually self-certify - so you'll sign a statement saying I didn't file the FBAR because I basically didn't know about it. There are some other requirements to be aware of as well. In this program, you'll pay a five percent penalty on the maximum balance of your foreign exchange value.
submitted by Sal-BitcoinTax to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

US Tax Guide for Cryptocurrencies

Introduction:  
Greetings, cryptax! Tax season is upon us, and in the next couple of months, taxpayers across the US will be filing their 2017 tax returns. As a tax professional, an Enrolled Agent, and a cryptocurrency investor and enthusiast, I wanted to write up a brief guide on how your investments in cryptocurrencies are taxed in the US.
 
 
1. Are cryptocurrency realized gains taxable?
Yes. The IRS treats virtual currency (such as cryptocurrency) as property. That means if you sell BTC, ETH, or any other cryptocurrency that has appreciated in value, you have realized a capital gain and must pay taxes on this income. If you held the position for one year or less, it is a short-term capital gain which is taxed at your ordinary income tax rate. If you held the position for more than one year, it is a long-term capital gain which is taxed at your long-term capital gains tax rate. In most cases, this is 15%, but could also be 0% or 20% depending on your specific ordinary income tax bracket.
 
2. If I sell my BTC for USD on Coinbase but do not transfer the USD from Coinbase to my bank account, am I still taxed?
Yes. The only thing that matters is that you sold the BTC, which creates a taxable transaction. Whether you transfer the USD to your bank account or not does not matter.
 
3. If I use my BTC to buy another cryptocurrency (XMR for example), is this a taxable transaction?
Most likely yes. See #4 below for a more detailed explanation. If assuming crypto to crypto trades are not able to be like-kind exchanged, then continue on to the next paragraph here.
This is actually two different transactions. The first transaction is selling your BTC for USD. The second transaction is buying the XMR with your USD. You must manually calculate these amounts (or use a website such as bitcoin.tax or software to calculate it for you). For example, I buy 1 BTC for $8,000 on Coinbase. Later on, the price of 1 BTC rises to $9,000. I transfer that 1 BTC to Bittrex and use it to buy 38 XMR. I have to report a capital gain of $1,000 because of this transaction. My total cost basis for the 38 XMR I purchased is $9,000.
 
4. If I use my BTC to buy another cryptocurrency, could that be considered a tax-free like-kind exchange?
Probably not. The new tax law says that like-kind exchanges only pertain to real estate transactions. This was done with Section 13303, which replaced “property” with “real property” for all of Section 1031 (page 72 near the bottom). My personal interpretation:
In 2018 and going forward, cryptocurrencies can definitely not be like-kind exchanged.
In 2017 and before, it is a very gray area. I personally am not taking the position that they can be like-kind exchanged, because if the IRS went after a taxpayer who did this, the IRS would probably win and the taxpayer would owe taxes, interest, and probably penalties on every single little gain made from trading one cryptocurrency for another.
Here is a great interpretation of why trading cryptocurrency for cryptocurrency is probably not a like-kind transaction.
In my opinion, the biggest factor is that like-kind exchanges must be reported on Form 8824 and not just ignored. Therefore, if a taxpayer is claiming like-kind exchanges on crypto to crypto exchanges, he or she would have to fill out a Form 8824 for each individual transaction of crypto to crypto, which would be absolutely cumbersome if there are hundreds or thousands of such trades.
Another is that there has to be a Qualified Intermediary that facilitates a like-kind exchange. So, it's a more involved process, and that's why I think cryptocurrency cannot be like-kind exchanged.
Here is another article about like-kind exchanges.
Here is the American Institute of CPAs' letter to the IRS, dated June 10, 2016, asking them to release guidance on whether crypto to crypto can be like-kind exchanged or not. The IRS has not responded to the letter.
 
5. How do I calculate the realized capital gain or loss on the sale of my cryptocurrency?
The realized gain or loss is your total proceeds from the sale minus what you purchased those positions for (your cost basis). For example, you bought 1 BTC for $3,000 in June of 2017. In December of 2017, you sold that 1 BTC for $18,000. Your realized gain would be $18,000 - $3,000 = $15,000. Since you held it for one year or less, the $15,000 would be a short-term capital gain taxed at your ordinary income tax rate.
 
6. Which BTC's cost basis do I use if I have multiple purchases?
The cost basis reporting method is up to you. For example, I buy my first BTC at $3,000, a second BTC at $5,300, and a third BTC at $4,000. Later on, I sell one BTC for $8,000. I can use:
FIFO (first in first out) - cost basis would the first BTC, $3,000, which would result in a gain of $5,000.
LIFO (last in first out) - cost basis would be the third BTC, $4,000, which would result in a gain of $4,000.
Average cost - cost basis would be the average of the three BTC, $4,100, which would result in a gain of $3,900.
Specific identification - I can choose which coin's cost basis to use. For example, I can choose the second BTC's cost basis, $5,300, which would result in the lowest capital gains possible of $2,700.
The IRS has not given any guidance on cost basis accounting methods for cryptocurrency, but I am taking the position that any method can be used, and that you can change your method at any time as you please (e.g. FIFO for one year, LIFO for another. Or, FIFO for the sale of a specific lot, then LIFO for the sale of another lot on the same day).
 
7. If I end up with a net capital loss, can I claim this on my tax return?
Capital gains and capital losses are netted on your tax return. If the net result of this is a capital loss, you may offset it against ordinary income on your tax return, but only at a maximum of $3,000 per year. The remaining losses are carried forward until you use them up.
 
8. What is the tax rate on my capital gains?
If long-term, the tax rate is 0%, 15%, or 20%, depending on your ordinary income tax bracket. If short-term, the tax bracket you’ll be in will depend on your total income and deductions. The ordinary income tax brackets are 10%, 15%, 25%, 28%, 33%, 35%, and 39.6% in 2017 and 10%, 12%, 22%, 24%, 32%, 35%, and 37% in 2018 and going forward.
Here are the 2017 and 2018 ordinary income tax brackets.
Here are the 2017 and 2018 long-term capital gains tax brackets.
Here is a detailed article on how the calculation of long-term capital gains tax work and how you can take advantage of the 0% long-term capital gains rate, if applicable.
 
9. If I mine BTC or any other cryptocurrency, is this taxable?
Yes. IRS Notice 2014-21 states that mining cryptocurrency is taxable. For example, if you mined $8,000 worth of BTC in 2017, you must report $8,000 of ordinary income on your 2017 tax return. For many taxpayers, this will be reported on your Schedule C, and you will most likely owe self-employment taxes on this income as well. The $8,000 becomes the cost basis in your BTC position.
 
10. How do I calculate income for the cryptocurrency I mined?
This is the approach I would take. Say I mined 0.01 BTC on December 31, 2017. I would look up the daily historical prices for BTC and average the high and low prices for BTC on December 31, 2017, which is ($14,377.40 + $12,755.60) / 2 = $13,566.50. I would report $13,566.50 * 0.01 = $135.67 of income on my tax return. This would also be the cost basis of the 0.01 BTC I mined.
 
11. Can I deduct mining expenses on my tax return?
If you are reporting the income from mining on Schedule C, then you can deduct expenses on Schedule C as well. You can deduct the portion of your electricity costs allocated to mining, and then you depreciate the cost of your mining rig over time (probably over five years). Section 179 also allows for the full deduction of the cost of certain equipment in year 1, so you could choose to do that if you wanted to instead.
 
12. If I receive BTC or other cryptocurrency as a payment for my business, is this taxable?
Yes. Similar to mining, your income would be what the value of the coins you received was. This would also be your cost basis in the coins.
 
13. If I received Bitcoin Cash as a result of the hard fork on August 1, 2017, is this taxable?
Most likely yes. For example, if you owned 1 Bitcoin and received 1 Bitcoin Cash on August 1, 2017 as a result of the hard fork, your income would be the value of 1 Bitcoin Cash on that date. Bitcoin.tax uses a value of $277. This value would also be your cost basis in the position. Any other hard forks would probably be treated similarly. Airdrops may be treated similarly as well, in the IRS' view.
Here are a couple more good articles about reporting the Bitcoin Cash fork as taxable ordinary income. The second one goes into depth and cites a US Supreme Court decision as precedent: one, two
 
14. If I use BTC or other cryptocurrency to purchase goods or services, is this a taxable transaction?
Yes. It would be treated as selling your cryptocurrency for USD, and then using that USD to purchase those goods or services. This is because the IRS treats cryptocurrency as property and not currency.
 
15. Are cryptocurrencies subject to the wash sale rule?
Probably not. Section 1091 only applies to stock or securities. Cryptocurrencies are not classified as stocks or securities. Therefore, you could sell your BTC at a loss, repurchase it immediately, and still realize this loss on your tax return, whereas you cannot do the same with a stock. Please see this link for more information.
 
16. What if I hold cryptocurrency on an exchange based outside of the US?
There are two separate foreign account reporting requirements: FBAR and FATCA.
A FBAR must be filed if you held more than $10,000 on an exchange based outside of the US at any point during the tax year.
A Form 8938 (FATCA) must be filed if you held more than $75,000 on an exchange based outside of the US at any point during the tax year, or more than $50,000 on the last day of the tax year.
The penalties are severe for not filing these two forms if you are required to. Please see the second half of this post for more information on foreign account reporting.
 
17. What are the tax implications of gifting cryptocurrency?
Small gifts of cryptocurrency do not have a tax implication for the gift giver or for the recipient. The recipient would retain the gift giver's old cost basis, so it could be a good idea for the gift giver to provide records of the original cost basis to the recipient as well (or else the recipient would have to assume a cost basis of $0 if the recipient ever sells the cryptocurrency).
Large gifts of cryptocurrency could start having gift and estate tax implications on the giver if the value exceeds more than $14,000 (in 2017) or $15,000 (in 2018) per year per recipient.
Here's a good article on Investopedia on this issue.
An important exception applies if the gift giver gives cryptocurrency that has a cost basis that is higher than the market value at the time of the gift. Please see the middle of this post for more information on that.
 
18. Where can I learn even more about cryptocurrency taxation?
Unchained Podcast: The Tax Rules That Have Crypto Users Aghast
IRS Notice 2014-21
Great reddit post from tax attorney Tyson Cross from 2014
 
19. Are there any websites that you recommend in helping me with all of this?
Yes - I have used bitcoin.tax and highly recommend it. You can import directly from an exchange to the website using API, and/or export a .csv/excel file from the exchange and import it into the website. The exchanges I successfully imported from were Coinbase, GDAX, Bittrex, and Binance. The result is a .csv or other file that you can import into your tax software.
I have also heard good things about cointracking.info but have not personally used it myself.
 
20. If I move my BTC from one exchange to another, or into a hard wallet, is this a taxable event?
No - you are not selling anything, so no gains are realized.
 
21. Where do I report cryptocurrency sales on my tax return?
The summary of your sales would reported on Schedule D on line 3 and/or line 10 depending on short-term or long-term. Supplemental Form 8949 must also be included with Box C or Box F checked depending on short-term or long-term. Form 8949 is where you must list each individual sale.
 
22. If coins become lost or inaccessible (e.g. lost or forgotten passphrase or thrown away hard drive), can I claim that as a loss? What about coins that have gotten stolen? What about losing money in investment or ICO scams (e.g. Bitconnect or Confido)?
These are really tricky questions. Unfortunately, the potential to claim such a loss against ordinary income is very low, especially with the new tax law. At the very least, capital losses can be claimed, but the deduction is capped at $3,000 per year against ordinary income with the rest carrying forward indefinitely.
The new tax law changed the casualty and theft loss to only apply to presidential disaster areas, so at least in the case of a loss passphrase, I think the answer is no for 2018 and going forward. For 2017, the answer is possibly yes. Here is an article on the subject if you are interested in reading more.
 
23. Taxation is theft!
Sorry, I can't help you there.
 
 
That is the summary I have for now. There have been a lot of excellent cryptocurrency tax guides on reddit, such as this one and this one, but I wanted to post my guide on cryptax which hopefully answers some of the questions you all may have about US taxation of cryptocurrencies. Please let me know if you have any more questions, and I’d be happy to answer them to the best of my ability. Thank you!
Regarding edits: I may make many edits to my post after I originally post it. Please refresh to see the latest edits to my guide. Thank you.
 
Disclaimer:
The information contained within this post is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended to substitute for obtaining tax, accounting, or financial advice from a professional.
Any U.S. federal tax advice contained in this post is not intended to be used for the purpose of avoiding penalties under U.S. federal tax law.
Presentation of the information via the Internet is not intended to create, and receipt does not constitute, an advisor-client relationship. Internet users are advised not to act upon this information without seeking the service of a tax professional.
submitted by Nubboi to cryptax [link] [comments]

Bitcoin & IRS Auditing - A Podcast Discussion

I recently interviewed Alex Kugelman, a tax controversy lawyer - I asked him about IRS audits in relation to crypto trading. Below is a link to the podcast interview itself, as well as a summary I wrote up. Thought this would be a good place to post (let me know if I'm wrong about that).
BitcoinTaxes Podcast Link

Highlights:
IRS audits are a real possibility for anyone who has traded cryptocurrencies. Our guest today is Alex Kugelman, a tax controversy lawyer with an abundance of knowledge concerning cryptocurrency audits. He's here to share his expertise on IRS cryptocurrency audits, including risk reduction strategies as well as enforcement predictions and misconceptions.
Alex Kugelman specializes in IRS audits. His experience includes four years of Federal government court experience at the U.S. Tax Court and a U.S. District Court. [00:40]
Alex: I'm an attorney out in California. I clerked for a US District Court judge and as well as the United States Tax Court. I've been in private practice exclusively doing tax controversy work for the past five years or so. I kind of got involved with crypto towards the end of 2016. I tended to represent clients mainly with compliance & disclosure issues with respect to cryptocurrency. I just really like it. Really interesting area.
The Coinbase summons in 2018 played a major role in Alex's interest in crypto audits. [01:19]
Alex: What started me into the crypto space was when the IRS first issued summons for Coinbase. We started getting some interesting calls regarding that. And at that time I thought to myself, this might be an interesting area. So I started following the actual summons enforcement proceeding at the District Court here in San Francisco - from there kind of worked with people under different types of compliance, including international disclosures. Now we're starting to see some of the first cryptocurrency audits come through.
First, let's get a brief rundown of how IRS audits work. [02:00]
Alex: It is important to understand the IRS as an administrative agency and all different layers of it. So when it comes to an audit the term that the IRS uses is an examination and there's three basic levels.
The first is a correspondence exam. That's where you get a letter that says, dear taxpayer, so-and-so reported that you had $100 of interest income that wasn't on your tax return - we're going to increase your tax. If you want to challenge that, you can. And that's basically termed an under reporter notice. That's probably not going to be a cryptocurrency audit if you get that notice.
The next one is an office exam. That is someone in the local IRS office sending you a letter that says, we have selected a certain tax return for audit and we're going to look at these issues. We'd like you to call us to schedule an appointment. That's going to be usually a tax compliance officer that is doing that.
The third and probably the most serious level of exam is a field examination. That's also going to be a local IRS representative, typically a revenue agent. There, the revenue agent may come to your work or ask come to your work or business to kind of conduct the audit.
All three of those are going to start the same: a letter that's sent to you at your most recent address provided to the IRS.
Cryptocurrency audits follow a similar protocol. [05:40]
Alex: I think it's likely that most crypto audits are going to start with one of two things happening. One is that there is information from the Coinbase summons that is inconsistent with what was on a taxpayer's tax return. I think for someone who's involved with that issue, they're going to have a good sense of that one because they should've gotten an email notice from Coinbase.
Or two, the audit notice is going to identify older tax years - 2013, 2014 or 2015 because those are the years that the information related to.
Another reason I think people will get audited is going to be because information on the return is incomplete, in the sense that the taxpayer or the cryptocurrency owner reports some transactions, without enough detail to figure out the actual cost basis.
Does reporting your data in an aggregated fashion increase your chances of being audited? [06:45]
Alex: I mean one - to the extent that there's going to be a lot of taxpayers - a lot of people use TurboTax, right? If that's the way TurboTax is preparing all of those returns, it would seem to me you're kind of in a herd of people like that. And at least it's consistent with what a lot of people are doing. The second part of that is going to be at least those people who have prepare the returns in that manner, they're going to, or should have, the underlying data. So even if it's an aggregate reporting of each asset class as opposed to each individual trade, if there ever were questions then you're going to have your CSV files, you're going to have your Bitcoin.tax exports, you're going to have all the information that you need to back that up.
Alex is an advocate of over-reporting your information to the IRS. [09:30]
Alex: I'm a big proponent of over-reporting - and I don't mean paying too much tax. I just mean including too much information. Because at some point there's kind of two ways that your returned can be flagged: a computer flags the return for some reason or there's a special unit or a person who actually flags it. At the end of the day, a human being will be looking at that return and deciding whether it actually is going to go all the way through to an audit. I want them to completely understand what's being reported, why it's been reported, and if there's too much information, that's fine - it's less likely that someone's going to have more questions.
A crypto audit is very likely to be a field exam - and it's important to hire a good rep. [11:00]
Alex: It's very likely going to be a field exam, which means you're going to have a revenue agent - and those are kind of the best of the best auditors for an IRS audit. And remember - an IRS audit is a civil matter. It is not criminal at this point. Again, it's unlikely that it will become criminal. It is, however, the highest level of audit you're going to get.
If you're going to hire a representative, which you have every right to do, you should contact that person, let them know what's going on and probably have them interface with the auditor. You should receive, as part of the opening notice or letter, the information document request - which is identifying what things to bring for the auditor. Also, it'll tip to what topics might be important. For example the typical things you're going to see will be bank statements, financial or asset account statements, which I view as requesting exchange statements or exchange CSV files. Any documents that show the cost basis for your cryptocurrency trades.
Audits are more art than science. [13:35]
Alex: The auditor has a fair amount of power. So if you play real hardball - that's not going to prevent the auditor from expanding to other years. So when you get that audit notice ,and let's say that you're going to deal with this yourself, the first thing you want to kind of figure out is what are the areas that I wouldn't want to go into, and what are the areas that I don't have good records? That will help guide the way to respond or what information to pull together.
The reality is, and let's just be honest here - for most people reporting cryptocurrency gains, they have all of the information. The IRS does not have much. They might have some records from Coinbase, but it's not as if they have a treasure trove of third party data.
The burden is really going to be, in every audit, on the taxpayer to prove their tax return is correct.
It's difficult to say how lenient the IRS will be regarding past years. [15:35]
Alex: I think the way that I would look at it is that maybe the standard of of records required to really substantiate older years might be a little bit lower for older years as opposed to now because it's different now. There's a lot better information provided by some of the exchanges. There's a lot more software out there to help you, especially for people who are newer to crypto. You should have access to all your bank records. You should still have a lot of emails, reflecting on-ramping off-ramping, or other purchases. You should be able to kind of pull this all together.
I can understand when we have clients who come in and are early adopters and they're missing chunks of information. So I do think that in those types of circumstances, yes, I think there would be a little bit of leniency. But I don't think if you're asking, hey, I reported my gains in 2017 but I never really did it 14, 15 or 16 - I don't think that's going to be viewed very favorably.
It is possible to substantiate your data without all of your records. [19:00]
Alex: I think the first thing is, I mean, outside of cryptocurrency and just generally in audits, how many people have complete records to support everything on their tax return from three years ago? Right? It's just not the reality.
The best source of information in a lot of these cryptocurrency clients are the clients themselves. They kind of know what they did and they can remember. There's some who take good notes and other people don't, but as you go through and ask people: what exchanges have you've been on, what type of coins, if you bought any ICOs, have you ever sold for actual US cash, and have you ever bought goods or services? As you talk through things people tend to recall what happened. We use that information and we cross check that against bank statements, as well as CSV files, to pick out what those transactions look like.
Most people have some sort of records, at least reflecting the transfer in and the transfer back out of that exchange. So you can use historical data and historical pricing information to essentially estimate what that transaction would have been. And then what we do is we provide a written statement summary of what we're doing and why we're doing it.
The other big one that we see all the time - and anybody listening to this, please hear this, do not trade for your friends on your exchange accounts - because that type of commingling causes such major problems. Essentially you are walking into those taxable gains just because you're allowing someone access to the exchange to make sales.
If you need representation for an audit, get representation. [23:00]
Alex: My general rule is that I think experienced representatives are really important. I probably would not hire the CPA that prepared my return unless they were: one, experienced with being a representative in audits. And two, you felt comfortable that they weren't going to go in there with a conflict of interest. But I do think if you're worried about going into audit - hiring a skilled, and experienced rep is really, really important.
If they're experienced with this, they should understand the appropriate ethical standards and go in there and essentially help resolve portions of the audit and move it to a resolution that you can deal with.
Taxpayers actually have a lot of leverage in an audit. And that sounds crazy to say, but there is a lot of truth to that. And so as you're kind of working through the audit itself, you want to make sure that you're not just agreeing to something to be done with it. You're not agreeing to something just because you think that you'll get in more trouble or get a worse result otherwise.
There are important risk-reduction strategies you can utilize to avoid a crypto audit. [28:15]
Alex: The first thing that you really want to do, is just assess; for those of you that are really worried about an audit - just assess what it is you've actually done over the years. When did you start trading, what exchanges were you on, do you have records that reflect on-ramping and off-ramping? And that's going to be your bank account statements. Do you know where you've been, what exchanges you've been on?
For foreign exchanges, there may not be as much of that AML & KYC compliance, but I really believe that you do have reporting requirements under FATCA for FBAR and something called an 8938, which if you listen to the podcast with Tyson, he kind of explains what that is. But it's basically if you have ownership of a foreign bank account or asset, you have certain reporting requirements, whether you've had income or not.
You want to make sure you at least track when you've actually exchanged crypto for cash or vice versa. That's partly because that's one of those areas where when people can get in trouble with some sort of federal investigators - because those types of transactions can be potentially considered money laundering.
For those who believe that they've used like-kind exchange rules to defer taxable gains -you should look on your tax returns to see if you filed the form 8824, which is where like kind exchanges are actually reported. That kind of goes back to the over reporting issue I was talking about before. I think that if you didn't report the actual trades that you're taking like-kind treatment for in past years, I don't know that you've actually taken like-kind treatment to be frank with you. I think, objectively, that might be viewed as just not reporting certain transactions.
You want to make sure that you address these issues sooner rather than later.
1099-K forms can be misleading - to the recipient and, potentially, the auditor. [32:40]
Alex: A 1099-K is actually a merchant processing third party information returns. And it really is typically associated with people who have credit card sales - so it's going to reflect a gross amount and typically on a monthly basis.
It shows the gross amount and what I've seen too is that sometimes transfers actually get caught into that amount as well. So it's not even just gross sales or purchases - it may have other information. So the 1099-K can be really inflated. That's why reconciling that against accounting records is really, really important because that is one of those issues that I think could lead to an exam.
To those who think crypto isn't beholden to tax laws: you are not correct. [37:38]
Alex: The current commissioner of the IRS is Charles Rettig, and he's a really well known practitioner in tax controversy. I know from people that know him well, that he's actually mentioned Reddit as one of the reasons that cryptocurrency enforcement is his number one enforcement priority right now.
The other person that I've seen speak a couple of times is the head of the IRS Criminal Investigation Unit. His name is Don Fort and every year he does a presentation at the National Tax Controversy and Criminal Tax Conference. The last two years cryptocurrency has been number two and number one on his list. As much as the IRS lacks the funding and the manpower that it needs for all the enforcement, the IRS CI are really, really good and they are probably best agency at dealing with cryptocurrency enforcement issues.
I really think that it's gaining steam and I think once the audits from the Coinbase summons kind of get going, I think it's going to be a really scrutinized area. I think the people who have gone through the cost and the pain of disclosing and amending returns and doing everything they can will be happy that they did in a couple of years. I think the other people are going to be sweating it out - I don't know if it's ever really worth it to be honest with you. I would recommend people do their best to get in compliance.
In summary: do your best to report your crypto gains and losses - and don't try to pull one over on the IRS. [42:36]
Alex: For people who have potential issues with past years, one is getting a consistent record and just amending your past years, so they're consistent.
For people who have the foreign account issues - let's just say, for example, had an account with Binance, and that Binance account was never reported. The IRS has disclosure programs that allow you to amend certain returns, pay the tax that you report and pay a penalty, which would be 5% of the the highest account value that you have.
For people who don't want to deal with this, I think taking evasive steps is the best way to get the worst result possible. One of the things that I learned very early in dealing with audits and tax compliance, is that you can always make things worse. I think you really just want to address it and resolve the issue while you have a good opportunity.
We may see criminal prosecution of some of the "big fish" tax evaders from the Coinbase summons. [46:43]
Alex: Yeah, and I think the two things that I'm fairly certain we're going to see: one is we're going to see the IRS use the information provided by Coinbase to start auditing the biggest account holders from that period. I think that's very likely.
Probably the second one that I would say is very likely is that you're going to see limited criminal prosecutions related to cryptocurrency. And these are going to be people that have some sort of level of notoriety, whether actually famous or maybe famous in the cryptocurrency world. That's typically how the IRS and Department of Justice uses limited resources to prosecute criminal tax tax crimes.
Alex is a great guy to reach out to with any audit-related questions, crypto or otherwise. [48:50]
Alex: You can go to my website: www.kugelmanlaw.com. You can email me at [email protected]. I have clients all over the country, international clients. If you need any sort of help, whether that's representing you, or at least doing the nitty gritty audit investigation, we're always willing to talk to people and help them out as best we can.
---
If you would like to request a topic for an interview, or have any questions related to this podcast, you can reach out to me at [email protected].
submitted by Sal-BitcoinTax to btc [link] [comments]

BitcoinTaxes Podcast: FBAR & FATCA Filing for Crypto Traders

BitcoinTaxes Podcast Link
Guest: Andrew Gordon, ESQ.
Topic: FBAR & FATCA Filing for Crypto

Summary:
Our guest, Andrew Gordon, is a tax attorney who understands the ins and outs of foreign account reporting in relation to cryptocurrency trading. Andrew joins us to discuss FBAR & FATCA reporting, the penalties associated with not reporting, and to address whether he believes crypto traders should be filing these forms.
Andrew has been working in the crypto-space since 2014. [00:24]
Andrew: Actually several years ago, ago in 2014, we had a client approach us who was getting paid "magic internet money", from the Ethereum Foundation. Back then the IRS had not released any guidance - it wasn't till later in 2014 that the IRS even defined Crypto as property. That was our first introduction and we were and presented the question of, well, if I'm getting paid these random tokens called Ethereum, how do we account for this?
In terms of foreign account reporting, there's two main forms you need to know about: FBAR & FATCA. The FBAR is a separate form that is due the same day as your returns. [02:42]
Andrew: FBAR is my favorite four letter word. It stands for "Foreign Bank Account Report". It isn't actually filed with your tax return. It's a separate form. It's filed online, electronically. It has the same due dates as your tax returns - April 15th and it can be extended six months to October 15th. So same due dates, but it's filed differently, still sent to the Department of Treasury - it's a separate form.
On the FBAR form, what taxpayers have to do is they have to identify the maximum value at any time during the tax year of their foreign bank accounts. If that value at anytime exceeded $10,000, you have to report. The FBAR is an informational form, which means that there's no tax actually owed.
There are popular exchanges that ARE considered foreign entities and some that are NOT considered foreign entities.[04:15]
Andrew: Unfortunately, it's not that easy because a lot of exchanges don't even make their address public - it's pretty hard to find. Even just as a starting point, I would list out all of the exchanges that you've used and try to use Google to find their addresses.
There's a couple that we know are considered foreign financial institutions at this point, and the most popular is Binance. In addition, many people suspect that Bitfinex has kind of self-reported themselves as a foreign financial institution and their information is being shared with taxing authorities.
Coinbase, Gemini, GDAX, and a number of others are considered a US-based institution.
The FATCA form is 8938, and is part of your tax-return. [06:15]
Andrew: It's very similar to the FBAR, but it's not exactly the same. One of the first differences is that the threshold for FATCA is higher. For the FBAR, your aggregate maximum holdings have to exceed $10,000. Aggregate meaning that when you add your bank accounts or crypto exchanges together, the maximum during the year exceeds $10,000.
The FATCA threshold, for a single person, is $50,000. FATCA, just like the FBAR, is an informational form, which means again, there's no tax due. The government just wants to know the maximum value of each account. One of the other differences is that FATCA is more general, so FBAR only requires foreign bank accounts to be recorded, whereas FATCA is both bank accounts and foreign assets.
There's no tax involved with these forms - but there are significant penalties for not filing when required to do so. [07:57]
Andrew: The penalties for not filing an FBAR can be very severe. One of the most basic penalties for not filing an FBAR is $10,000 per year - for non-willful offenders.
If you were willful and you just disregarded your requirement to file? Well then the penalties can be even higher - up to 75% of the maximum value of your account or your exchange values. It can be very severe. So while there's no tax, the penalties are much greater. It's one of those things to do to comply with the rules.
The FATCA form also has similar penalties.
The burden of proof for "non-willfulness" is on you. [10:14]
Andrew: To be able to prove that you are not-willful is very difficult. In general, if you file and sign your tax returns, you are signing under penalties of perjury that everything is correct. You have an obligation to know the requirements and just saying "I didn't know the law" is not sufficient proof of non-willfulness.
If you've exceeded these limits in previous years, but didn't file these forms, there are still feasible options to consider…but these options may not last forever. [16:25]
Andrew: I would suggest that if you met these requirements in earlier years, take corrective action to amend or file the returns properly. There are some IRS programs that are available to come forward and file these forms for earlier years with a reduced penalty - or in some cases, no penalty at all.
The IRS Streamlined Offshore Disclosure Program. Under this program, you have to be non-willful and you will actually self-certify - so you'll sign a statement saying I didn't file the FBAR because I basically didn't know about it. There are some other requirements to be aware of as well. In this program, you'll pay a five percent penalty on the maximum balance of your foreign exchange value.
If you enjoyed our podcast, be sure to check back frequently for more great discussions about a range of topics in the crypto space. If you have any questions for Andrew Gordon, he can be reached via his website, Gordon Law LTD, or via Twitter @Accounting.
If you would like to request a topic for an interview, or have any questions related to this podcast, be sure to reach out to us at [email protected].
submitted by Sal-BitcoinTax to bitcointaxes [link] [comments]

03-02 21:02 - 'Is there a list for the address of each cryptocurrency exchange?' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/patrotor20 removed from /r/Bitcoin within 4140-4150min

'''
I'm looking at the Fincen 114 FBAR reporting requirements and it requires you to put in the address of Binance or Kucoin.
Is there a way to find a physical address for each crypto exchange?
'''
Is there a list for the address of each cryptocurrency exchange?
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: patrotor20
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Hi /r/Ethereum! I quit my job to start Cointaxes to answer questions about taxes and digital currencies so you can have confidence even if you're not a HODLer! Sharing our first comprehensive article on the Coinbase & Gemini 1099-K. Would love your input on ANY other topics or questions! :)

Hi /Ethereum! Thank you for reading this.
I felt the world of digital currencies is a bit too uncertain, so I want to do what I can to create more confidence and certainty! Please let me know if you have any questions or comments (I'll probably respond to every comment here!)
Check out our first comprehensive article on the Coinbase / Gemini 1099-K
Some "fun" facts you may not know about digital currency taxes
Here's two quick "fun" facts you may not know. We will be posting in-depth articles on these, too. Consider subscribing to our newsletter to hear first when they've been published!
About Cointaxes
Cointaxes was formed and funded with the mission to establish confidence and certainty around cryptocurrency.
We see global adoption of digital currencies as an inevitability. The uncertainty lies in how effectively and smoothly this once-in-a-lifetime shift occurs. As a tax preparation service, we have a special seat in the cryptocurrency ecosystem directly related to this uncertainty: it is our job to help both citizens and governments around the world understand how to use and treat digital currencies.
If our mission excites you
Disclaimers
Important Disclaimers: This is NOT tax advice and should NOT be relied upon for making any tax decisions. We always recommend speaking to a tax professional before making decisions related to your taxes and our guides are not a substitute for tax advice. While I have assembled and provided this information to the best of its knowledge, I make no representations or warranties as to the accuracy or timeliness of the information contained herein. You can read the full disclaimers here.
submitted by StopTheVok to ethereum [link] [comments]

[Guide in progress] - Reporting trades on TurboTax Online

I wanted to consult the resident geniuses on this forum on how I'm reporting trades this year on Turbo Tax Online. If this is accurate, other people can consider using it if they're not mega millionaires like me and can't afford a few thousand dollars for a specialized CPA.
Step 1 - I used bitcoin.tax to compile all my trades and cost basis from coinbase, binance, etc. Step 2 - I selected LIFO to keep track of my inventory and hope the IRS doesn't stipulate FIFO in the future. I suspect most of us benefit from this method of inventory accounting. Step 3 - Bitcoin spits out a variety of files including a Form 8949 statement. I use the XLS file that collates all my trades and cost basis.
This is were it gets funky. TurboTax online doesn't let you upload files like the downloadable version. I use the online version because it has a lot of my data from previous years and ~effort~. For people with more than 50 trades, or who don't want to manually enter trades, buying the downloadable version probably makes more sense.
Instead, since my trading history is very modest compared to most here, I manually enter 50 some entries into TurboTax in the section:
Stocks, Mutual Funds, Bonds, Other
I copy/pasta each trade, including the description of what was sold, the date sold, total sale proceeds, and cost basis. I select "no financial institution."
TurboTax Online should then generate its own Form 8949 when I finalize and submit my return.
Because I never had more than 10k USD in Binance, I don't have any FBAR reporting requirements.
If I'm audited, I have all my records courtesy of bitcoin taxes.
Is there any other form or issue that I'm not accounting for? I think based on my research I should be clear, but I'd love a gut check.
Seb
submitted by Sebayn to CryptoTax [link] [comments]

[uncensored-r/CryptoCurrency] Hi /r/CryptoCurrency! I quit my job to start Cointaxes to answer questions about taxes and digita...

The following post by StopTheVok is being replicated because some comments within the post(but not the post itself) have been openly removed.
The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ CryptoCurrency/comments/7w500o
The original post's content was as follows:
Hi /CryptoCurrency! Thank you for reading this.
I felt the world of digital currencies is a bit too uncertain, so I want to do what I can to create more confidence and certainty! Please let me know if you have any questions or comments (I'll probably respond to every comment here!)
Check out our first comprehensive article on the Coinbase / Gemini 1099-K
Some "fun" facts you may not know about digital currency taxes
Here's two quick "fun" facts you may not know. We will be posting in-depth articles on these, too. Consider subscribing to our newsletter to hear first when they've been published!
  • Non-deductible personal loss: You should never exchange your digital currency directly for ANY goods or services. If you happen to have a loss on that trade, it will be non-deductable as capital gains losses ONLY apply to "investment" not "personal use" activity. You can read more about this on Forbes, Time and the IRS website.
  • FBAR requirements: This isn't explicitly tax related, actually, but a LOT of my US friends do not know about this important filing. If you ever on a single day, even, held $10,000 USD worth of value overseas (Binance, for example), you must meet your FBAR online filing requirements. The penalties can be severe for failure to disclose. The deadline is April 15, but it will be extended to October 15 if you fail to file on time. You can read more about this on official government sites General FBAR information, FBAR FAQS (not super helpful IMO) and the online form itself.
About Cointaxes
Cointaxes was formed and funded with the mission to establish confidence and certainty around cryptocurrency.
We see global adoption of digital currencies as an inevitability. The uncertainty lies in how effectively and smoothly this once-in-a-lifetime shift occurs. As a tax preparation service, we have a special seat in the cryptocurrency ecosystem directly related to this uncertainty: it is our job to help both citizens and governments around the world understand how to use and treat digital currencies.
  • We will regularly invite regulators, lawyers and tax experts to private discussions and public webinars to ensure you will have a firm understanding with each regulatory shift as the world adopts cryptocurrencies.
  • We will conduct proprietary research and publish Cointaxes Guides to answer questions you may have about using your digital currency.
  • We will provide high quality cryptocurrency tax preparation software for individuals and tax professionals.
If our mission excites you
  • Please know that we are hiring. Contact [email protected] with a resume and cover letter.
  • If you're are regulator or a crypto-experienced legal or tax professional, please contact [email protected] with some background information and reason for connecting.
  • Please consider following us on Twitter and liking our Facebook page!
Disclaimers
Important Disclaimers: This is NOT tax advice and should NOT be relied upon for making any tax decisions. We always recommend speaking to a tax professional before making decisions related to your taxes and our guides are not a substitute for tax advice. While I have assembled and provided this information to the best of its knowledge, I make no representations or warranties as to the accuracy or timeliness of the information contained herein. You can read the full disclaimers here.
submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

[uncensored-r/Bitcoin] Hi /r/Bitcoin! I quit my job to start Cointaxes to answer questions about taxes and digital curre...

The following post by StopTheVok is being replicated because some comments within the post(but not the post itself) have been silently removed.
The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ Bitcoin/comments/7w4xj4
The original post's content was as follows:
Hi /Bitcoin! Thank you for reading this.
I felt the world of digital currencies is a bit too uncertain, so I want to do what I can to create more confidence and certainty! Please let me know if you have any questions or comments (I'll probably respond to every comment here!)
Check out our first comprehensive article on the Coinbase / Gemini 1099-K
Some "fun" facts you may not know about digital currency taxes
Here's two quick "fun" facts you may not know. We will be posting in-depth articles on these, too. Consider subscribing to our newsletter to hear first when they've been published!
  • Non-deductible personal loss: You should never exchange your digital currency directly for ANY goods or services. If you happen to have a loss on that trade, it will be non-deductable as capital gains losses ONLY apply to "investment" not "personal use" activity. You can read more about this on Forbes, Time and the IRS website.
  • FBAR requirements: This isn't explicitly tax related, actually, but a LOT of my US friends do not know about this important filing. If you ever on a single day, even, held $10,000 USD worth of value overseas (Binance, for example), you must meet your FBAR online filing requirements. The penalties can be severe for failure to disclose. The deadline is April 15, but it will be extended to October 15 if you fail to file on time. You can read more about this on official government sites General FBAR information, FBAR FAQS (not super helpful IMO) and the online form itself.
About Cointaxes
Cointaxes was formed and funded with the mission to establish confidence and certainty around cryptocurrency.
We see global adoption of digital currencies as an inevitability. The uncertainty lies in how effectively and smoothly this once-in-a-lifetime shift occurs. As a tax preparation service, we have a special seat in the cryptocurrency ecosystem directly related to this uncertainty: it is our job to help both citizens and governments around the world understand how to use and treat digital currencies.
  • We will regularly invite regulators, lawyers and tax experts to private discussions and public webinars to ensure you will have a firm understanding with each regulatory shift as the world adopts cryptocurrencies.
  • We will conduct proprietary research and publish Cointaxes Guides to answer questions you may have about using your digital currency.
  • We will provide high quality cryptocurrency tax preparation software for individuals and tax professionals.
If our mission excites you
  • Please know that we are hiring. Contact [email protected] with a resume and cover letter.
  • If you're are regulator or a crypto-experienced legal or tax professional, please contact [email protected] with some background information and reason for connecting.
  • Please consider following us on Twitter and liking our Facebook page!
Disclaimers
Important Disclaimers: This is NOT tax advice and should NOT be relied upon for making any tax decisions. We always recommend speaking to a tax professional before making decisions related to your taxes and our guides are not a substitute for tax advice. While I have assembled and provided this information to the best of its knowledge, I make no representations or warranties as to the accuracy or timeliness of the information contained herein.
submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

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